Course Descriptions 2017-08-24T06:32:33+00:00
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course Code Guide

The course numbering system consists of a 4-letter designation identifying the department and a 3-digit number identifying the class. The first digit identifies the year in which that class is normally taken (i.e. 100 level classes are freshman, 200 level classes are sophomore, 300 level classes are junior, and 400 level classes are senior). All 500 level classes are offered as Ecuador Semester Abroad classes only.

The Courses are grouped in the following departments:

BIBL    – Bible Exposition
DISC    – Discipleship Counseling
GMIN  – Global Ministry
HIST    – History
PMIN  – Pastoral Ministry
THEO  – Theology
LANG  – Foreign and Biblical Languages

Classes that were offered as part of the previous curriculum are included under one heading “Obsolete Classes.” Some of these classes may be offered or equivalents will be provided over the next few years. Obsolete classes all have 2-letter designations rather than the new 4-letter designations.

 

Bible Exposition (BIBL)

BIBL101 – Bible Study Methods (Hermeneutics) (3 Credits)
This is an introduction to basic Bible study methods and rules of interpretation. The student will develop skills in observation, interpretation and application. The course will include instruction as well as a significant amount of hands-on application to portions of Scripture.

BIBL102 – Old Testament Survey 1 (3 Credits)
The course is designed as a survey of the background and content of the first seventeen books of the Old Testament: Genesis – 2 Kings. An overview of the Old Testament will be presented using systematic, chronological, thematic and exegetical methods. The student will develop a biblical worldview, grasp the purpose of the Law and its typology, witness the unfolding of the Messianic anticipation and cultivate a worshipful heart from beholding God’s faithfulness to Israel.

BIBL103 – Old Testament Survey 2 (3 Credits)
The course is designed as a survey of the background and content of the poetic and prophetic books of the Old Testament: 1 Chronicles – Malachi. An overview will be presented with particular attention to the historical context, literary structure, and theological content of each book. This study is designed for the intellectual shaping and ethical development of the Christian student, who is not just a disciple of Christ’s teaching – but also a legitimate heir to Israel’s Scriptures. Prerequisite: BIBL102 Old Testament Survey 1.

BIBL104 – New Testament Survey (3 Credits)
An overview of the New Testament focused on the theme, purpose, structure, and basic content of each individual book and the relation of each book to the whole Bible. Strong emphasis is also given to the application of the message of each book for personal spiritual development, ministry and instruction.

BIBL201-410
Each class in this sequence will require the students to apply sound hermeneutical principles to the specific books. Each book will be studied in its entirety with particular attention paid to specific passages in order to equip students to discover the author’s purpose and to model how to study passages in depth. Students will be led to discover the author’s structure and purpose and begin to understand the overall flow of thought. Authorship, audience, background, genres, key themes, specific issues, and theological development will be discovered and discussed.

Students will be forced to grapple with the theological implications of the passages as applied in all areas of life and thought. One quarter (25%) of each Old Testament class (BIBL201-205, 310) and one third (33%) of each New Testament class (BIBL301-410) will be dedicated to practical application of those books to specific areas of life and ministry. Some of the specific areas that will be addressed in each class are specified in the individual class description below.

Each class in this series will be based on the concept of progressive revelation so discussion will be limited to books that have already been studied.

These classes will typically be offered in a module format rather than an entire semester format.

Note: each class in this sequence must be taken in order.

BIBL201 – Pentateuch (4 Credits)
Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy.

BIBL202 – Former Prophets (3 Credits)
Joshua, Judges, 1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings.

BIBL203 – Latter Prophets 1 (2 Credits)
Isaiah, Jeremiah.

BIBL204 – Latter Prophets 2 (3 Credits)
Ezekiel, The Twelve.

BIBL205 – Writings (4 Credits)
Ruth, Song of Songs, Lamentations, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah,1-2 Chronicles.

BIBL206 – Biblical Theology of the OT (2 Credits)
This class will examine the leading theological themes of the Old Testament, such as the presence of God, the kingdom, the messiah, salvation, the covenants, the land, and the Spirit. Attention will also be given to discussing the different ways in which scholars construct a biblical theology and the way in which OT Theology sets up the themes in the New Testament.

BIBL301 – Luke/Acts (4 Credits)
Luke and Acts.

BIBL302 – Matthew/Mark (3 Credits)
Matthew and Mark.

BIBL303 – Paul’s Missionary Epistles 1 (3 Credits)
Romans, Galatians.

BIBL304 – Paul’s Missionary Epistles 2 (3 Credits)

1-2 Thessalonians, 1-2 Corinthians.

BIBL305 – Paul’s Pastoral Epistles (2 Credits)

1-2 Timothy, Titus.

BIBL306 – General Letters (4 Credits)
Hebrews, James, 1-2 Peter, Jude.

BIBL310 – Wisdom Literature (3 Credits)
Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes.

BIBL401 – Paul’s Prison Epistles (3 Credits)

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon.

BIBL402 – Johannine Literature (3 Credits)
John, 1-3 John.

BIBL403 – Revelation (2 Credits)
Revelation.

BIBL410 – Romans (3 Credits)
Romans.

BIBL464 – Israel Study Trip (3 Credits)
This course is focused on the physical exploration of the land of the Bible, as a means of better understanding the biblical world. The emphasis of the trip will help to enhance the student’s knowledge of the geographical, historical, archaeological, and cultural backgrounds of the land of Israel, both ancient and modern. The student will be required to learn the regions and routes crucial to understanding the Bible, as well as learn key dates and events that have happened in biblical history.

 

Discipleship Counseling (DISC)

DISC101 – Introduction to Discipleship Counseling (2 Credits)
This is a practical course of study laying out foundational principles for living out God-honoring relationships. Particular attention will be paid to: worldview issues, sources of authority in people’s lives, how people change, and scripture’s teaching regarding biblical relationships. Specific topics covered will include dealing with sin, forgiveness, restoration, confrontation, and repentance. The ultimate goal of the class is to help people become more conformed to the image of Christ.

DISC202 – Advanced Issues (3 Credits)
Examining various issues and developing a Biblical response is the goal of this course. Using the principles presented in the Introduction to Discipleship Counseling a variety of issues will be addressed: eating disorders, homosexuality, abuse, addictions, trauma counseling, anger, divorce etc. Prerequisite: DISC101 Introduction to Discipleship Counseling.

DISC221 – Marriage and Family Issues (3 Credits)
The course is an examination of issues that arise in the context of the home. Not only is there an evaluation of marital and family problems but an application of the counseling process. It deals specifically with issues that are common to marriages and are often causes of difficulty including: understanding biblical roles of husbands and wives, in-law relationships, and child rearing. Prerequisite: DISC101 Introduction to Discipleship Counseling.

DISC310 – Youth Counseling (3 Credits)

 

Global Ministry (GMIN)

GMIN101 – Theology of Christian Missions (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help the student understand and articulate the Biblical implications of Missions throughout Scripture, the underlying principles found in the Scriptures for Christian Mission, God’s purpose, God’s passion, and God’s global mandate.

GMIN102 – Perspectives (3 Credits)
This course is designed to help the student develop a biblical, historical and cultural analysis of the impact of the world Christian movement. Specific attention is given to strategy and the imperative to bring the gospel to groups that have yet to initially receive it.

GMIN104 – Global Religions (2 Credits)
This course provides an understanding of the diverse beliefs and practices of the major religions of humankind by examining their historical backgrounds, religious texts, and contemporary documents. The uniqueness of the Biblical faith is demonstrated.

GMIN107 – Contemporary Insights in Global Ministry (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help the student understand and articulate the global implications of the Christian faith, world movements and events, and to challenge the student for a lifetime of engagement.

GMIN121 – Christianity and Culture (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help the student understand and articulate the task remaining to extend God’s kingdom to the fringes of the world, the necessity of pioneer church planting efforts, the multiplication of churches and the importance of bringing transformation.

GMIN122 – Cross-Cultural Church Planting (2 Credits)
This course is designed to give the student an analysis of New Testament church planting methods and of the essential requirements of planting a church in another culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the book of Acts.

GMIN202 -Missions Practicum (2 Credits)
This course is designed to help the student understand and articulate the incarnational model for cross-cultural ministry, understand the role of the local church in the missionary endeavor, and understand the necessity of missionary preparation. Topics include: steps to being sent; partnership with local churches; development of the home-front ministry; developing a support base; and charting a path from home to the field.

GMIN203 – Intercultural Communications (2 Credits)
It is imperative that Christians not only understand the gospel but also the cultural context to which they are communicating this message. This course will examine the latter by studying various approaches to communicating the gospel cross culturally.

 

History (HIST)

HIST101 – Old Testament Backgrounds (2 Credits)
In an effort to expose the student to the broader world of the Old Testament, this history course will trace the story of the Israelite nation, as it touches the surrounding contemporary peoples. Special emphasis will be given to geographical and archaeological issues, manners and customs, and other writings and inscriptions. The goal of this course is to understand the political interaction of God’s people within the context of its Near Eastern neighbors (i.e. Egyptians, Syrians, Assyrians, and Babylonians). The time span covered will be from the Patriarchal Age to the fall of the kingdom of Judah.

HIST111 – Foundations 1 (6 Credits)
A chronological study of God’s plan working out in history from creation to the present. This integrated study includes discussion of worldview, theology, history, comparative world religions, missiology, anthropology, and philosophy. This class is primarily discussion oriented based upon the required reading.

HIST112 – Foundations 2 (6 Credits)
A chronological study of God’s plan working out in history from creation to the present. This integrated study includes discussion of worldview, theology, history, comparative world religions, missiology, anthropology, and philosophy. This class is primarily discussion oriented based upon the required reading. Prerequisite: Foundations 1.

HIST211 – Foundations 3 (3 Credits)
A chronological study of God’s plan working out in history from creation to the present. This integrated study includes discussion of worldview, theology, history, comparative world religions, missiology, anthropology, and philosophy. This class is primarily discussion oriented based upon the required reading. Prerequisite: Foundations 2.

HIST212 – Foundations 4 (3 Credits)
A chronological study of God’s plan working out in history from creation to the present. This integrated study includes discussion of worldview, theology, history, comparative world religions, missiology, anthropology, and philosophy. This class is primarily discussion oriented based upon the required reading. Prerequisite: Foundations 3.

HIST301 – New Testament Backgrounds (2 Credits)
This is a history of the “Second Temple Period,” spanning the years from the Jewish return of Babylonian captivity, until the end of the Jewish Revolts in the second century AD. Attention will be given to key political events that took place in the “Inter Testamental” Persian and Hellenistic periods. The political, religious, and cultural influences bearing on the New Testament world will be a large factor in this course, and some source materials will be read.

HIST311 – Foundations 5 (3 Credits)
A chronological study of God’s plan working out in history from creation to the present. This integrated study includes discussion of worldview, theology, history, comparative world religions, missiology, anthropology, and philosophy. This class is primarily discussion oriented based upon the required reading. Prerequisite: Foundations 4.

HIST501 – History, Politics and Culture of Ecuador (2 Credits)
This course provides an overview of the history, politics, and culture of Ecuador, along with the relationship between various factors. The course includes guest speakers from local organizations and visits to community groups, along with lecture and readings. Open only to students who participate in the Ecuador Semester Program.

 

Foreign and Biblical Languages (LANG)

LANG 211 – Greek Grammar 1 (4 Credits)
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of New Testament (Koine) Greek. Beginning grammar and vocabulary will be taught so that the student can identify the various forms of words in the Greek language (including all the parts of speech and even irregular verbs). The goal of the class is for students to be able to indentify these forms, understand their basic meaning, and to have enough vocabulary to form a foundation for further study of the language.

LANG 212 – Greek Grammar 2 (4 Credits)
Building upon the foundation of Greek Grammar I, Grammar II students will use the vocabulary and grammar they have learned to translate various portions of Scripture (usually 1st John and Philippians). Students will move beyond simply knowing how to identify various forms to learning the significance of the points of grammar. The emphasis in this class will be learning how to interpret the Greek text and to use the elements of Grammar to exegete New Testament passages. Prerequisite: LANG211.

LANG 222 – Hebrew Grammar 2 (3 Credits)
Building upon the foundation of Hebrew Grammar I, Grammar II students will use the vocabulary and grammar they have learned to translate various portions of Scripture (usually Jonah and Ruth). Students will move beyond simply knowing how to identify various forms to learning the significance of the points of grammar. The emphasis in this class will be learning how to interpret the Hebrew text and to use the elements of Grammar to exegete Old Testament passages. Prerequisite: LANG221.

LANG 311 – Greek 3 (2 Credits)
This course will build on the foundation of Greek I & II. There will be continued work dealing with the nuances of New Testament Greek as well as significant time spent in translation of Biblical books. The goal of this course is to further teach students the nuances of Greek syntax and grow their understanding of Greek exegesis. Prerequisite: LANG212.

LANG 501 – Spanish (5 Units)
This course will introduce students to the sounds and structure of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course will provide the basis to understand and communicate Spanish effectively. Open only to students who participate in the Ecuador Semester Program.

Pastoral Ministry (PMIN)

PMIN101 – Ministry Involvement Elective (1-2 Credits)
Students may earn up to 2 credits per semester and 4 credits total for ministry involvement. Each credit hour requires 4 hours of ministry involvement per week for the entire semester. The appropriateness of the ministry and the degree of involvement is overseen by the Dean of Students. This class is always Pass / Fail.

PMIN302 – Philosophy of Ministry (3 Credits)
The student will be exposed to different philosophies of ministry and develop an overall personal philosophy of ministry. In depth study and focus will be given to various biblical texts dealing with ecclesiological issues. An emphasis will be given to the implementation of that philosophy in specific areas of ministry and life.

PMIN322 – Communication (3 Credits)
Designed to train the student with the skills necessary to effectively prepare and deliver expository messages from the Word of God. Special emphasis will be placed on practical preparation of the teacher and the message with numerous examples and practical assignments. Prerequisites: BIBL101 Bible Study Methods, BIBL102-103 Old Testament Survey 1-2, and BIBL 104 New Testament Survey.

PMIN420 – Missional Church (2 Credits)
The Missional Church course is designed to begin the process of developing a biblical philosophy of church ministry within members of God’s church. The course begins by providing an overview of the story of God then focusing specifically on the centerpiece of human history – the gospel of Jesus Christ. The gospel defines God’s mission and His vehicle to accomplish His mission – the church. This gospel then transforms His people individually and corporately into various identities that God created His church to be. These identities shape the patterns of life and rhythms of activity within God’s people. God uses His gospel message to mobilize His people uniquely to join with Him in advancing His mission outwardly to every nation. The church is created by God to declare and demonstrate an accurate picture of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

PMIN421 – Missional Leadership (2 Credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the lifestyle of missional leadership. Students will learn about God’s heart as a shepherd and God’s heart for shepherds. The course will discuss how to effectively disciple members of the church, how to biblically evaluate the health of a body of believers, how to mobilize members of the body for mutual edification/discipleship and how to focus a body outward towards gospel mission. Other practical ministry topics will also be discussed such as caring for the social outcasts and widowed as well as ministering to the sick and suffering.

PMIN422 – Pastoral Ministry (2 Credits)
An introduction to the privileges and responsibilities of pastoral ministry outside of teaching and preaching. This will include hiring staff, working with volunteers, performing marriages and funerals, etc.

PMIN501 – Spiritual Formation (2 Credits)
The course will examine the dynamics of personal development in student’s lives, focusing on spiritual growth. Biblical principles that govern the character and conduct of Christians will be addressed. Students will employ analytical tools and reflection skills to develop a greater self-awareness. From this foundation they will explore the process of spiritual formation and establish an initial life-plan for the regular practice of spiritual disciplines. Open only to students who participate in the Ecuador Semester Program.

 

Theology (THEO)

THEO310 – Ethics (2 Credits)
This course will introduce the student to the study of Christian ethics. It will examine and evalute different Christian ethical systems and then work through various ethical test-cases, including warfare, poverty, and immigration.

THEO312 – Theology of Worship (3 Credits)Students will explore the concept of worship in Scripture.  The class will explore various contexts in which worship takes place: private worship, corporate worship, and the role of music in worship.

THEO316 – Theology of Work: Why Work Matters (3 Credits) This course will help students develop a Biblically grounded Theology of Work that will build from biblical foundations to practical applications in specific areas of work.

THEO341 – Gospel and Culture (2 Credits) This course will introduce the concept of Biblical / narrative theology to students and how to apply it to local culture with inter-cultural sensitivity.

THEO350 – Final Project: A Plan for the Future (CTL) (2 Credits) This course will be tailored to the individual student’s future plans. This course will lead a student through examining a particular vocation or college setting to understand and anticipate how to be effective for the gospel in their chosen setting./p>

THEO401 – Historical Theology 1 (3 Credits)
A study of the development of theology from the Apostolic period until the Reformation. Although history will be discussed, this class will emphasize development of doctrine rather than specific dates and events in history. Prerequisite: BIBL403 Revelation.

THEO402 – Historical Theology 2 (3 Credits)
A study of the development of theology from the Reformation until the Present Day. Although history will be discussed, this class will emphasize development of doctrine rather than specific dates and events in history. Prerequisite: THEO401 Historical Theology 1.

THEO404 – Christianity and the Arts (2 Credits)
This class develops a philosophy of Christian engagement with the surrounding culture in general, and the arts in particular. Special attention is given to music, film, painting, and forms of literature. The class is practically focused and includes hands-on projects to give students experience with creating various forms of culture.

THEO408 – Worldview and Apologetics (3 Credits)
This course will include time learning how to examine a culture in order to identify the questions, concerns, and presuppositions inherent in that culture. The course will also define and describe various worldviews. Time will be spent examining the defense of Christianity from the questions that a given culture asks.

THEO410 – Senior Project (2 Credits)
This class will require students to pick a specific problem and / or theological issue in a specific culture and then proceed to apply all of the tools and information that they have gained through their studies to address this specific problem. This will involve exegetical work to understand the meaning of relevant passages, background study of the problem and culture involved, and thoughtful application of the principles of scripture to the chosen situation. This class is designed to provide a model for the students to implement the knowledge they have gained in a life of ministry in whatever culture they may live. Prerequisite: BIBL403 Revelation.

THEO421 – Seminar in Bibliology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Bibliology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO422 – Seminar in Theology Proper (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Theology Proper, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO423 – Seminar in Christology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Christology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO424 – Seminar in Soteriology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Soteriology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO425 – Seminar in Pneumatology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Pneumatology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO426 – Seminar in Anthropology/Hamartiology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to biblical anthropology and hamartiology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO427 – Seminar in Ecclesiology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to bibliology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO428 – Seminar in Prolegomena (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Prolegomena, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO429 – Seminar in Eschatology (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Eschatology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO430 – Discerning the Cults (2 Credits)
This class will enable the student to understand essential differences between Christianity and various cults and religions and how to more effectively witness to those entrenched in false beliefs in comparison to what the Bible teaches.

THEO431 – Theology of Paul (2 Credits)
This course will cover the spectrum of Paul’s Theology. Special attention will be paid to his teaching on justification by faith, his view of the Law, and his use of the OT. The class will also interact extensively with the controversial so-called “new perspective” on Paul.

THEO432 – Seminar on the Trinity (1 Credit)
An in-depth study of selected topics relating to the Trinity, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important contemporary and historical debates.

THEO501 – Worldview and World Religions (2 Credits)
The goal of this course is to understand the nature of a worldview and the function of faith and reason in developing a worldview. Students will be able to define and analyze eight basic worldviews: Christian theism, deism, naturalism, nihilism, existentialism, Eastern pantheism, New Age spirituality and postmodernism. This course will also explore and critique six major world religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, Taoism & Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. Open only to students who participate in the Ecuador Semester Program. This class fulfills the requirement for THEO408.

 

General Studies – Transfers (GSTR)

The General Studies requirement includes eighteen (18) units of credits that must be taken at another institution and transferred to EBC. These classes are usually taken at a Community College, but may be taken at any appropriately accredited college. Students attending the Simi Valley campus will usually take these classes at Moorpark Community College. The following class descriptions are to help aid students in choosing appropriate classes to fulfill the requirements. These classes are not offered at EBC.

Students must take the following to fulfill the requirement:

1. GSTR101 – English
2. GSTR102 – Social Science
3. GSTR103 – Physical or Biological Science
4. GSTR104 – Philosophy
5. GSTR105 – Political Science / Economics / Cultural Anthropology
6. GSTR106 – Logic / English Literature / History / Foreign Language

GSTR101 – English (3 Credits)
Any 100 level English course or higher would fulfill this requirement. The purpose would be familiarity with composition as well as general familiarity with written expression.

GSTR102 – Social Science (3 Credits)
100 level courses or higher with a primary focus of introducing principles of Psychology or Sociology. The purpose will be to gain exposure to how the world processes personal or social development.

GSTR103 – Biological OR Physical Science (3 Credits)
The primary purpose is to gain an introductory understanding of the scientific world. Various courses would fulfill this requirement; Biology, Botany, Chemistry, or Physiology/Anatomy courses would be some examples.

GSTR104 – Philosophy (3 Credits)
Any 100 level course or higher whose primary focus is to introduce students to primary issues in philosophy. Any course dealing with issues of epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, and ethics will be considered. The primary purpose is to gain exposure to primary systems of thought in the western world.

GSTR105 – Political Science/Economics/Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits)
Any 100 level course in Political Science, Economics, or Cultural Anthropology would be considered. The primary purpose would be to see how entire people groups develop various systems in society and then examine how those systems function.

GSTR106 – Logic/English Literature/History/Foreign Language (3 Credits)
Any 100 level course or higher that has a primary focus on Humanities. Primary purpose will be to expand awareness of human development. Various History, or English Lit. courses will meet this requirement. An introductory Logic course will also fulfill this requirement. A foreign language course will also fulfill this requirement (Biblical Languages excluded).

 

Obsolete Classes

The following classes do not apply to the curriculum that began in the Fall of 2008. They will still be offered for a period of time in order to help students in the previous curriculum finish their program of study.

PM401, 402 – Internship I and II (2 Credits)
Second year students are required to complete a one-year church project. The project will follow the area of ministry into which the student believes God is leading him/her. The Director of Student Life must approve the ministry project.

PM442 – Certificate Internship (1 Credit)
Certificate students are required to complete a one-semester church project. The project will follow the area of ministry into which the student believes God is leading him/her. The Director of Student Life must approve the ministry project.

TH101 – Theology I (3 Credits)
(Bibliology, Theology Proper, Pneumatology)
A study of the Divine origin, nature, collection and preservation of the Scriptures that enlarges student confidence in the Bible. Secondly, the study will consider the personality and nature of the true and living God; and a study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit.

TH102 – Theology II (3 Credits)
(Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology & Soteriology)
A study of the origin, fall and total depravity of man, the glorious person and work of the Savior, Jesus Christ, and the transformation from death to life in salvation. These rich truths will compel the student to boast in Christ alone.

TH201 – Theology III (3 Credits)
(Angelology, Ecclesiology & Eschatology)
The biblical study of angels will include their origin, work and the rebellion of Satan and demons. The doctrine of the church will also be studied covering its nature, importance, officers, and ordinances. Finally, the doctrine of Final Things will be considered with emphasis on the Rapture, the Tribulation and the Millennial Kingdom.

TH202 – Contemporary Theological Issues (3 Credits)
A biblical evaluation of a broad range of relevant theological issues that face the church in the 21st century. This appraisal will include movements as well as current trends in theological thought such as open theism and egalitarianism. The goal of this class will be to provide a critical and biblical evaluation of these trends and movements in order to provide the students with a firm basis for understanding. Prerequisites: TH101, TH201, TH102 (concurrent enrollment acceptable).

TH221 – Apologetics (3 Credits)
This course will include time learning how to examine a culture in order to identify the questions, concerns, and presuppositions inherent in that culture. The course will also define and describe various worldviews. Time will be spent examining the defense of Christianity from the questions that a given culture asks.

TH402 – Church History (3 Credits)
A study of the development of the essential doctrines of the Christian faith throughout history. Special emphasis will be given to the Reformation and the Puritans.

DC101 – Theological Foundations of Discipleship Counseling (3 Credits)
This course explores the inseparable relationship between counseling and theology. Particular attention is paid to the study of man (pre-and post-conversion), the Bible, Sanctification, the Holy Spirit, and study of God. The goal of the course is to establish that counseling cannot be independent from theology but is actually theology applied

SM101 – Youth Culture (4 Credits)
A hands-on approach to understanding youth culture. Students will be exposed to different sub-cultures and their activities, as well as developing strategies for reaching specific sub-cultures.

GE101 – INSIGHT into the Ancient World (INSIGHT 1) (8 Credits)
(Creation- 400 B.C.)
The first semester INSIGHT begins with a foundational study of the importance of worldviews, how to discern a person’s worldview, logic and critical thinking, principles of interpretation and guidelines for Socratic discussion. Students delve into the mysteries of the existence of the world, the creation vs. evolution debate raging today, and the rise of ancient civilizations. Beliefs of animism, naturalism, and Old Testament Judaism are explored. As the study proceeds through history, historical writings, and the Old Testament, foundational understanding is built on the history of religions and cultures of Egypt, Israel, Assyria, Babylonian and more distant peoples.

GE102 – INSIGHT into the Classical World (INSIGHT 2) (8 Credits)
(400 B.C. – A.D. 400)
Following the introduction of the classical period of the Persians, Greeks, and Romans, Israel’s history and mission is traced into the New Testament. Topics include the philosophies of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle; the Greek and Roman pantheon of gods; Greek and Jewish Christian thought; and their various impacts on the classical world. The development and spread of the early Christians church, including doctrine and Scriptures, is studied thoroughly. Civilizations in other geographic localities are also studied, including the origins and beliefs of Hinduism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Shinto, Taoism, et al. Principles of logic, interpretation, and clear thinking, discussing and writing, are emphasized throughout the semester.

GE103 – INSIGHT into the Expanding World (INSIGHT 3) (8 Credits)
(A.D. 400 – A.D. 1800)
In this section it begins with the study of the New Testament and spread of Christian faith continues. Rome collapses under barbarian invasions, the monastic orders preserve and spread knowledge of Scripture, Islam rises as a world power, the conversion of whole people groups being to take place, the Vikings slaughter villagers and burn monastic libraries, plagues and the misguided Crusades decimate Europe, and the church hierarchy becomes embroiled in politics and corruption. Meanwhile the quiet grassroots spread of the Christian faith continues into Europe, Asia and Africa. Some of the most influential writings in Christian history are covered. Religions and worldviews studied include Islam, Naturalism, Deism, Nihilism, and Existentialism. Aristotle’s view of science is slowly overturned and science makes great new discoveries through devout Christians such as Pascal, Isaac Newton, Michael Faraday, James Clerk Maxwell, and others. The Renaissance and Reformation flow into the Enlightenment and Colonial Era, as a dizzying array of worldviews and cultural imperatives clash on a global scale as never before. The transformation into the modern world is explored through a study of expansionism, revolutions, evangelical revivals, the rise of nationalism and industrialism, the Protestant mission movement, social and slavery reforms, and the rise of Darwanism.

GE104 – INSIGHT into the Modern World (INSIGHT 4) (8 Credits)
(A.D. 1800 – present)
The second half of the semester covers the modern era, from 1914 to present day. Increasing emphasis is put on the cross-cultural communication / understanding, anthropology and the rise in indigenous movements to Christ in other cultures. The impact on today’s world of the World Wars, Communism, dictatorships, science and technology, urbanization, affluence, revivals, social reform, civil rights, feminism, and terrorism, as well as the development of a global economy and civilization is studied. Ethics and the Christian church is discussed in the context issues such as poverty, famine, health, AIDS, technology, environment, politics, abortion, and genetics. The study of contrasting worldviews continues with current states of religions such as Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism, along with modern worldviews such as Postmodernism, Marxism, Pluralism and the New Age.

NT301 – Life of Christ (4 Credits)
A comprehensive and chronological overview of the life, ministry and sacrifice of Jesus Christ as seen in the gospels.

OT240 – The Minor Prophets (2 Credits)
An expositional study of the Minor Prophets, with special emphasis given to understanding interpretation of books with different styles, purposes and settings in the Old Testament and how to apply Biblical principles from such differing contexts today.

BI401 – Deuteronomy (2 Credits)
An exposition of the book of Deuteronomy with a special focus on the historical background of the book and God’s covenant relationship with His people Israel.

BI402 – Daniel & Revelation (4 Credits)
An expositional study that emphasizes the prophetic outline of these books. The questions of authenticity will be considered. The student will be required to master and defend the movements of the texts.

BI411 – Romans (3 Credits)
An expositional study that emphasizes the righteousness of God seen in His wrath against sin, His grace in salvation, His provision for sanctification, His sovereign plan for Israel and His holy call upon the saint. The student will be required to master the movements of the book to develop a foundation for evangelism, godliness and service.

BI412 – Isaiah (3 Credits)
A study of the writing’s of Isaiah, examining various themes such as historical, prophetic significance and the nature of God.

BI420 – I Corinthians (2 Credits)
An expositional study that examines the innate structure of the book. Natural textual consideration will be given to church division, ethics, church order and spiritual gifts.

BI421 – II Corinthians (2 Credits)
An expositional study that examines the major themes of the book with a special focus on the nature of Paul’s ministry.

BI423 – Isaiah/Jeremiah (2 Credits)
A study of the writings of Isaiah and Jeremiah, examining various themes such as: the historical developments in each book, the prophetic significance of key passages, and the emphasis of these books regarding the nature of God.

BI431 – Acts (3 Credits)
An expositional study that examines the foundations of the early church with a special focus upon the spread of the Gospel to the Jews and Gentiles through the ministry of the apostles.

BI432 – Colossians (3 Credits)
The course is designed as an exposition of the background and content of Colossians. A detailed examination of the text (in English translation) will be presented with particular attention to the historical context, literary structure, and theological content of the book. This study is designed for the intellectual shaping and ethical development of the Christian student, with a strong emphasis on the implications of Paul’s worldview in Colossians for the North American church context.

BI440 – Ephesians (3 Credits)
An expositional study of the flow and thought of Paul in this important book with specific emphasis on the implications for the church today, and the salvation and daily life of believers.

BI441 – Hebrews (3 Credits)
An introduction to the epistle with special attention given to authorship, the work of Christ, and the difficult passages in this book.

BI446 – I & II Peter (3 Credits)
A study of the writings of Peter, with special attention given to the themes of suffering, submission, joy and apostasy.

BI461 – Pastoral Epistles (2 Credits)
An expositional study of I & II Timothy and Titus, with special emphasis given to the practical application of the instruction in these books to church life and spiritual leadership in the church today.

BI471 – Wisdom Literature (3 Credits)
A study of the wisdom of Solomon and its practicality for life and godliness. Such topics as wisdom, the fool, friendship, family, fearing God, life and death, and the sluggard will be covered.